Coming soon, the New Tokyo Station

Coming soon, the New Tokyo Station by Steve Nagata

Still scheduled to be completed this year, the renovation work on the Marunouchi side of Tokyo Station is still under way. The new domes over the North and South entrances can now be seen popping up from the scaffolding surrounding the building.

For as long as I have known it, Tokyo Station has been an underground building. The Marunouchi side was a quick post war knock off of the original building and has for all intents and purpose been a condemned building for years. This new renovation is supposed to return the building to its pre war original state. I’m dreaming of a new, but classic design that will add visibility and access to the tracks and bring ye station out of its underground cocoon. Tokyo needs a signature station like Grand Central in New York or Moscow subway station. Hopefully we’ll get a chance to see this landmark rise again in a few months.

Read more on Tokyo station here. en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tōkyō_Station

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About Steve

Gadget Addict, Tokyo Resident and Techno-Luddite. Training, Solutions, and New Media Specialist. Not a fan of Mosquitoes.

Posted on October 11, 2011, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Regarding your comment about the subway stations in Moscow – to be fair, there isn’t really a signature station, it’s more of a situation where all the stations that were being built during the USSR era, were made to top each other for no purpose beyond showing off, and so you get dozens of stations which look more like museums and art galleries than actual subway stations.

    Though of course all the ones built since the collapse of USSR are toned down to say the least.

  2. At least they did not demolish it and build another skyscraper! I remember the beautiful historic brick Marunouchi Building across the street from the station when I used to work for MELCO. “Maru Biru” had some great restaurants and shopping in its beautiful halls was took you back to the art deco age. It was replaced with an ugly modern glass building that has more real estate space (its lower level tries to copy the style of the original). No regard for history – it should have been protected as a national landmark!

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